Skip to main content

About your Search

20111001
20111031
STATION
SFGTV2 1297
LANGUAGE
English 1297
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,297 (some duplicates have been removed)
land, that's what this is all about and i'm not here to you -- we netherlands you need to do in the u.s. and in san francisco specific, but just pick out the things that are useful for you and translate them into u.s. opportunities in san francisco, new opportunities. it's not my task to say you must do it like we do in the netherlands. i'll just show you what we do in the netherlands. and about myself, my name is hillie talens, as you were already told. i work for krowell, which is an n.g.o. and not for profit company, and i work as a bicycle ambassador for the dutch cycling council. on this slide you can see are my hobbies. my greatest passion are turtles. i've checked them since i was a little girl and i can be very philosophic about it but that is for lunch break. and another hobby of mine is traveling and that comes together with my profession very well because now i'm here and i live in the netherlands. how far can you travel? making pictures, photographer is -- photography is another way of fend spending my free time and in my slides you will see some results of that hobby and co
old one that's very noisy i use for commute ing and i have a nice one which i use when i'm in town, go shopping or go see friends or elsewhere. so i have three bicycles and i use them in different ways. for commuting and business travels i always use train, public transport. that's the easiest way to get from a city center to another city center and when i really want to have fun i take my motorbike. that's the nice green vehicle on the bottom of the slide. my presentation. i'll start with some facts and figures, then the benefits for the society, the dutch dutch. how we do it in the netherlands and then i go deeper into bicycle infrastructure. that's the main reason for this workshop and also the main argument for using bicycle or not using bicycle. i go briefly into enforcement in education and i come up with some conclusions. bike ownership in the netherlands and other european countries. i don't have the u.s. figures here. i have to go to my notes. but you can see the netherlands is top in europe as it comes tobacco ownership. we have more -- to bicycle ownership. we have more bicy
, all of the districts are soma mixed use districts. most of this will become eastern neighbor had mixed use districts. it did not go to the same planning process, but it is part of the neighborhoods. the new districts are kind of blend of the old soma districts and the new eastern neighborhood districts. they do not fit well enough to go to the straight districts. there's already mixed use general right now. but there will also be a western soma mixed use general. it is not the same. we provided a comparison table, which i believe is comprehensive and readable, to show you of the new districts compared with the eastern neighborhood districts and how they lined up. most of the new districts are going to be eastern neighbor had mixed views districts. the western soma muo. there will be a big-time emphasis on cards. that is very much like a pdr district. a couple districts that will be a better neighborhood commercial districts. those would be the olson street ntc. folsom street is envisioned as the main street, so that will be an nct district. and then there will be the rcd, regiona
you to support us. we're concerned residents obviously. to not issue this permit or at least give some type of review. also this is why i think you for your time and the service you provide to the community. this is the first time i have come to one of these hearings so i definitely appreciate everything you do for our community. president olague: are there any additional speakers in support of the dr requestor? everyone gets three minutes. that does not work. you can use your three minutes to read those letters but the visit. if there is one other person who wants to read the letter, whatever. >> i was going to be the reb utter. i will reserve my comments. president olague: you can speak. >> i am an attorney who has been asked to assist in the presentation. i am not a resident of the area and i will try to be brief. i did prepare an analysis of the proposed analysis that you got and i would like to provide that to you although i realize it is late and i apologize for that. i got into this project on the late side. i will give it to you through what ever -- for whatever consideration y
, that will have the chance to use these trucks and the way in which they operate. the very essence of city fleet operations. so i want to thank chrysler for allowing sanfrancisco to experiment with our department of energy, and also while we are experimenting with this, we have uc-davis as a partner. we have the director of our plugged in demonstration project. working together with the transportation electrification institute here. with their corporations, getting the data about how these vehicles are used, how they are tested, whether they can go up hills as efficiently, bringing up the cargo and animals and tool that dpw will use, various departments inspecting buildings, streets, all of the different uses for a city fleet, all on the dime of the department of energy because they want to see these the electric vehicle properly used, the way that we use our fleet generally now. ali, they will be replacing the fleet that we are using now and saving that money. and then do what i do, i keep in mind -- i do not ever want to run out of the electric power. as i come to city hall, i asked my staff,
, thank you. commissioners, you are now on item 11, case number 2011.0532, use of signs, building features, floor area ratio, parking, and compliance in specified use districts. we will also hear a case number 12, 2011.0533z at the same time, washington-broadway special use district, waterfront's special use district 2 and 3, special districts for sign illumination, and special districts for scenic streets. >> good afternoon, commissioners. i am from supervisor chu's office. >> good afternoon. thank you commissioners and members of the public. i represent supervisor david chu, who represents district 3, which is the neighborhood largely covered by this ordinance. i appreciate the opportunity to be at the hearing today for this informational hearing. i have some brief comments and i will also want to address the process and next ups. first, a typable. -- a topical point. this will facilitate seismic safety for new construction or retrofits. that will not help but the shaking a few hours ago, but it will help us with the next one or the one after that. this ordinance updates and improve vari
made by bicycle, average in the netherlands. denmark, 18%, germany, 10%. and in the u.s., average in your country is 1%. the latest figures i've got. and as i've told you it's the average, 27%. but if you have a closer look and you look at short-distance trips then it's 34% on the bike and 15% of trims up to 10 miles we also use the bicycle. still a great share. and we have two cities that are top of our bike use. the city of gronig and the city of shola. over 50 october of of all trips daily made by bike. and for regional use of the bicycle. got some figures compared to a car. then you can see that schoolchildren use the bicycle very frequently for education. and still businessmen use the car a lot. and social recreational reasons. a reason for using the bike and shopping. we like to go shopping on our bikes. come to that later. and when it comes to gender. who's using the bicycle. i'm told that the netherlands is very typical on this. we have more women on bikes then -- than men. and the most intense users are girls from the age of 12 to 18 and that's easy to explain because i o
crowd here for what for us is an extremely important event. my name is ed reiskin. i'm the transportation director here in san francisco and very pleased to welcome you all here this morning for what we expect will be a very lively and productive couple of days here in san francisco. the san francisco m.t.a. is the agency that's charged with implementing the city's transit first policy, which is about getting people out of their cars and into more sustainable modes of transportation, such as bikes, such as walking and transit in our great muni system. as someone who myself gets around the city often by bike, and i do that by choice, but more importantly, i'm given the charge of our agency to get folks out oaf their cars. i can't tell you how exciting it is for me to think all of the brain power and enthusiasm for cycling that's in this room are going to spend the next two days working with us to help us figure out how we can do every -- even better. although we've done a lot in terms of bicycling and increasing the mode of bicycling as a transportation of choice and w
also use the bicycle. still a great share. and we have two cities that are top of our bike use. the city of gronig and the city of shola. over 50 october of of all trips daily made by bike. and for regional use of the bicycle. got some figures compared to a car. then you can see that schoolchildren use the bicycle very frequently for education. and still businessmen use the car a lot. and social recreational reasons. a reason for using the bike and shopping. we like to go shopping on our bikes. come to that later. and when it comes to gender. who's using the bicycle. i'm told that the netherlands is very typical on this. we have more women on bikes then -- than men. and the most intense users are girls from the age of 12 to 18 and that's easy to explain because i once was a girl of that age and to me, mabika was my ticket to freedom. i didn't want my mom and dad bringing me by car somewhere and then say well, i'll pick you up at 6:00. i go on my bike and i'll try to make it at 6:00. most of the time i was there. 6:30. and then later you can see at all ages, women still use the
an important one and i think all of us, it's testament to the men that tony and vince were that vuso many people coming out once again to support one another and first and foremost, to support the valario and the perez family. this is a very special day because it is another illustration of just how special vince and tony were to all of us and how they will live on in our hearts and our minds and also in san francisco fire department's history because they gave their lives in their duties. thank you so much for everyone that's in attendance. we have uniformed members of this department. we have many of the civilian members of this department. all of us hear your pain and grieve with you and continue to grieve with you and you have my commitment that we will continue to be here with you as a family. not as replacements for tony and vince, but as supporters. and those of you that will continue to always contact you and reach out to you and i want you to know that you have a family in all of the members of the san francisco fire department. today we're joined by several people. i'd like to a
of this grant and the mayor coming to tell us that he supports these efforts in the strongest possible way and will over the next administration is just news that's important for everybody in the community. so we're proud to be here and i can't wait to see who hits that wall with that hammer. and begins the good work. congratulations, everyone. [applause] >> i think, with that, we're going to begin our ground breaking and i think our mayor has the opportunity for the first swing. mayor lee: are we ready? ok! [applause] >> hi. we'd like to welcome you to our brown bag lunch talk today. we do this every third thursday in san francisco. and today we are at e&e electric, 1775 mission street, right by the building department office where we are going to walk around and look at all of this fantastic equipment. shinny, wonderful stuff. complicated stuff. what could this possibly be used for? we have with us today, david green, senior electrical inspector who is a good friend of mine and a well-known sailor on the san francisco bay. you're going to sail this saturday. and mr. lloyd and mrs. lloyd.
of this fantastic equipment. shinny, wonderful stuff. complicated stuff. what could this possibly be used for? we have with us today, david green, senior electrical inspector who is a good friend of mine and a well-known sailor on the san francisco bay. you're going to sail this saturday. and mr. lloyd and mrs. lloyd. thanks for letting us come in here. really appreciate it. you're an electrical contractor, too. right? >> i'm electrical for 26 years. we do lots of big projects. we dot lots of industrial and commercial and residential. >> so you have to get a california special license. you have to be a special licensee to do electrical what is that license? >> yes. i have a c-10 licen and b license. >> b is a general contractor's license. >> yes. more interesting for me, i do a lot of c-10 for electrical. >> about three, four years ago you opened up a supply house. >> we opened e & e electric for around five years. >> you don't have so many guys out on the field any more. >> no more. i just have a lot of contractors. they come in for a lot of questions about national code. so if i understand, i t
take action today. we know that this is a discussion item. >> the supervisor has joined us. >> thank you for allowing me to speak. i appreciate you hearing me out of turn. we're having our supervisor meeting. i am here and support of the free muni past. i speak as a supervisor and as a former organizer. i am sure you have heard this several times already but use are facing a difficult time in our city. this is not often reflected in our city. the number of children enrolled has increased from 2008 at 54% to 54% in 2010. this is not include people who are underemployed and and documented. decisions. we're trying to face funding. i'm going from a fleet of 44 buses to 25. it is important that the city worse together to find a solution to address that. i think that this is an important project for the city. we have to put our money where our mouth is. we can encourage young people to write for free. i know students who wait for sudden bus drivers to come to their corner because they will allow them and their siblings on for free because they cannot afford passes. i know that they get on
of supervisors came together to select an outstanding choice along many outstanding candidates to lead us over the next several years. >> over the past several months when this issue has come up, it had been agonizing. the board has been put into a difficult situation. there are a lot of differences of opinion on how to run the city, how to mass make a decision, who should be in place, 11 people to agree on that is a challenging thing. i think we have done the best we can do in the process, considering the difference of opinions. >> the people of san francisco can now choose their mayor, the direction they want to go. that is why this decision was so appropriate. >> the other big shock is that the moderates seem to have won this round. people thought, progressives have themselves on the board. there is no reason that they will not get together and take a noted leader who is a progressive to be interim mayor, and then stayed there for another term. the great thing about being in term mayor is to get to run as an incumbent. the fact that the progressives could not get together to get somebody in
on behalf of mator's office of neighborhood services. mayor lee will be joining us later. with the invocations, we would like to invite pastor stacey kerns. >> good amp. let us pause for a moment to invite the presence of god. shall we pray together? god, our help in ages past, our hope in years to come, we invite your holy presence to bless this celebration of african-american history month. we give up thanks and praise for the legacy, the creativity, the genius and contributions of african-american people everywhere. we pray that you would strengthen this organization and strengthen all organizations that support telling the story of black history. and so today we ask that as we continue on the journey. that we might be able to do justice, love kindness, and walk hummably -- humbly with our god. may you bless this time together and all god's children say amen, amen, amen. >> and now if you would stand for "lift every voice and sing," sung by leah suites. >> ok. everyone can join in with me. ♪ lift every voice and sing ♪ tell up in heaven rings ♪ rings with a harmo
a discussion on this important topic. who used personal care products? shampoo, face cream, deodorant, contact solution? the numbers could be staggering. the stories that i tell in the book and stories i talk about today are store reus about all of us. to tell you a little bit about my personal story. i was a 17 magazine makeup reading desperate to read in. with each careful purchase, i was one step closer to that girl i dreamed up. i used lots of them, 20 products a day, makeup, skin creams, an enormous cloud of aqua net hair spray. this is the back in the days of big hair and shoulder pads and bright makeup. i looked up all these products as a teen, 20 products a day, i was surprised to discover, i had been with exposing myself to 200 products a day before i got on the school bus. what is in this stuff that we put on our bodies, put in our hair on a daily basis. that is what we have been working on and looking at for about the passed 5 years. these are the groups involved in the campaign for safe products. most poplar brands of all kinds of products, deodor rants, makeups, even baby shampoos
's not meant to use the cedar flute as a bit of exotica, but what the panelists have been speaking about. it's the use of all of it together is a way of trying to address, hopefully not in a way that homogenizing anything, hopefully not in a way that takes anything away from any of the traditions incorporated within it. we all come from jazz backgrounds, which is inherently about mixing in and of itself. but if you let that start to become homogenized, if you let that start to become blank, then i think you begin to suffer from this idea of cultural invisibility. who is who and what is what? i don't want to lose that in the music, just as the way the authors who formerly so eloquently spoke. that's what i'm trying to do when i put these songs to the. with that, i would like to give you the second arrangement and last song. i was taught pala singing. we tune because we care. i was taught how to sing by a man named dr. barney horner, who is the great grandson of chief john grass from standing rock reservation in south dakota. one of the songs he gave me before he passed on, on indigenous peopl
glass on mission street in san francisco with mr. ken paige. ken paige has generously invited us into his glass shop and gallery. and the paige glass goes back a long, long time, right? to preearthquake, whichever earthquake -- >> all of them. they're all good. >> when did paige glass start? >> the big one, 1906. >> this happened afs in your family, was paige glass back then? >> well, the 1906 was a very important year, of course, for san francisco, needless to say. the bad news was the death and destruction, city in flames. the good news for my grandfather was even though he was living, at that point, in a tent out in golden gate park, you know, one of a whole lot of people. the good news, he was a young glazer, and every window in the city was broken. >> a holy grail of glazing. >> [laughter.] >> so at that point, shortly after the tremors sopped, he said wait a minute, i've got this idea. so paige glass really started in 1906, with that quake. >> wow. >> and he was so busy, he didn't really form an actual company-company, a registered company till 1910. i think that was the fi
have any further questions about ranked choice voting, please contact us at department of elections, city hall, room 48, 1 dr. carlton be good lit place, sentences go, california, 94102. or 415-554-4375. visit our website, www.sfelections.org. >> welcome to the department of building inspection brown bag lunch. today we have an extremely special event. we are here at paige glass on mission street in san francisco with mr. ken paige. ken paige has generously invited us into his glass shop and gallery. and the paige glass goes back a long, long time, right? to preearthquake, whichever earthquake -- >> all of them. they're all good. >> when did paige glass start? >> the big one, 1906. >> this happened afs in your family, was paige glass back then? >> well, the 1906 was a very important year, of course, for san francisco, needless to say. the bad news was the death and destruction, city in flames. the good news for my grandfather was even though he was living, at that point, in a tent out in golden gate park, you know, one of a whole lot of people. the good news, he was a young glazer,
that was done to add them to the wall. >> to the families, thank you for being with us to honor your son's, your brothers and they will always be part of the ridge sacrifice it -- fabric of the san francisco fire department. to all those gathered, i can say that this is most difficult part of my career, losing tony and vincent. i could not be more proud of how we have all pulled together, stepped out, and supported one another. three and a half months seem like just yesterday and sometimes it seems longer, but i think it is important to continue to support one another. it is ok to feel down about this one because it was a tragedy. we continue to offer our condolences to both families. i know that tony and vincent are looking down on us and encouraging us to move forward in our lives. thank you for being here. we are going to conclude with asking the captain of station 26. i would like to give particular acknowledgment to the members of station 26 to have felt this probably the most deeply. not only did you work with them but you became very close as friends. on behalf of the members of the depar
because we use the internet. what we used to do was carry the large maps and it took a long time to find the information. >> it saves the city time and money. you are not taking up the time of a particular employee at the assessor's office. you might be doing things more efficient. >> they have it ready to go and say, this is what i want. >> they are finding the same things happening on the phone where people call in and ask, how do i find this information? we say, go to this website and they go and get the information easily. >> a picture tells a thousand stories. some say a map >> i should not be on stage. when you should be seeing -- i am used to the stage but not. that is who should be on stage. i am an animator. i am with picks are animation studios. in some ways, i felt comfortable being on stayed behind my computer. it is weird for me to be on the microphone. i have a lot of work to do but i am here to explain that, i'll come to that later. i wanted knowledge some of our special guests this morning. first off, i have some flashcards. how wanted acknowledged and the asian art m
award. this will be presented by the city librarian. please join us that the's abbottabad award goes to jose leon and chiles, chiles, chiles. [cheers and applause] jose is a san francisco native, born and raised in the mission district. he has worked in the nonprofit community for almost 30 years and is well known and respected for his support of youth involvement and empowerment. he has dedicated his work to make sure toyouth are well represented in our opportunity and that they had the opportunity to experience the wealth and richness of music and the arts. congratulations, and thank you for all your work in the mission district. [applause] >> you know, i would just like to say something peter i am very honored. thank you very much. but i have to think the parents. all the wonderful parents better here and all the wonderful students that i have worked with. so please give them a round of applause. thank you. [applause] >> we will be lucky enough to hear jose at the end of our program tonight. it is important to recognize dianna and also one of our sponsors deny, wells fargo, who is
-vot ago wiring used for communications. >> we have two kinds of wire. we have line voltage and low voltage. what is the difference between those two types. >> the low-voltage wiring doesn't present a shock hazard. you don't have to put the wires in a conduit or a cable. this is thermostat wire. it's called class two wire. when you have a class two transformer, you're allowed to run this cable either exposed or concealed in building construction without a cable. there would be an example of some similar. this would be computer wire and in a lot of new houses now that the people are putting the computer wire and telephone wires, as low as the thermostat wires in the walls and they don't have to use conduit or cable. all different colors. >> are there standards for what colors you use? is brown always used for thermostat wire? >> no code requirement. just a manufacturing requirement. all different colors. the only restriction that some jurisdictions do is they limit fire alarm cable to red. >> people have asked about insulation types, if you have heat blown through, you need higher-rated insu
go into the fund and could be used for maintenance and fine for using it for the dome and is beautiful and was a good use and unfortunately stiement san francisco does a good job of building and a poor job of maintaining. it is important for things that we have with our classic buildings and classic works of art that they be maintained and that may be a perfectly good use of those funds. the specific use of a specific nonprofit to utilize the funds and a little bit of caution on that. we have to have a lot of oversight to make sure it's certainly not that it isn't a very beneficial use putting an elevator in for accessibility and various other things and we are not getting art produced out of the funds. we're getting some other things. and that would have to be a supervisory to make sure it is exactly what we are, and the art commission review, again, that is something that would be up to the art commission i think as to how do they feel about that. i think there should be some review to the art and oz to the appropriateness. and i have certainly, this is not what' bef
? everyone. announcer: imagine if who you are were used as an insult. >> so it's a tremendous honor to be here today. we've got a tremendous program for you. this is our annual black history month kickoff. it was started many, many years ago. dr. carter g. woodson had participated in the founding of black history month. he was involved in the group known as the oh, -- association for the study of african-american life and history. the local chapter of that group is what is now known as the african-american cultural and historical society. so it's an honor. we've been doing this for many, many years and it's great to see so many faces out here today. right now what i'd like to do is thank our partners and acknowledge them for their participateation. the san francisco public library much the california cultural arts program and we couldn't do it without the good folks in the mayor's office of neighborhood services. what i'd like to do now is strue -- shall truce -- intro duce tanish hollins from the mayor's office of neighborhood services. >> good amp, family. happy black history mont
that only supplies the receptacles that you're going to be using for the computer or sensitive equipment is one answer. you want to make sure that you install that circuit, the wires are remote from any radio frequency devices or any other circuits that might impose a radio frequency on them. >> what kind of wires would impose a radio frequency? >> it could be a computer, another computer, it could be the microwave oven. >> you want to separate is from any other -- >> ideally. if you're running your wires in a raceway or an armored cable that uses ferrous metal, that protects those conductors against these radio frequencies much better than nonmetallic cable. that would be another strategy. and then if you're in a commercial installation where it is really, really important, you put in isolation transformers adjacent to the equipment. that's the most expensive solution but the best solution is to actually put an isolation device right at your equipment. they also have filters that you can buy, but that's a commercial-grade installation. residentially, a dedicated circuit, try to separate
challenging differences to come to a design that we believe will give us a jewel. landmark of a place. >> i am sure it will have refining effect like embark did. and there were people about that and no one would think of that today. and when you look at growth and transformation of the embark, the same with doyle. it will be a cherished part of the city and a worthy addition to what is there. >> it will be a safe and beautiful entrance to a spectacular beautiful city. it will be the entry to golden gate that san francisco deserves. >> so good morning and welcome mr. mayor, mr. council general. everybody. it's great to see such a great crowd here for what for us is an extremely important event. my name is ed reiskin. i'm the transportation director here in san francisco and very pleased to welcome you all here this morning for what we expect will be a very lively and productive couple of days here in san francisco. the san francisco m.t.a. is the agency that's charged with implementing the city's transit first policy, which is about getting people out of their cars and into more sustainable mod
contributions of african-americans in this city and how each of us has changed the gee graval and cultural landscape of this city. how fitting that we celebrate black history month today, which is also the same as lunar new year and also an opportunity -- opportunity to reflect on the diversity of this city and how happy we are to be in a city which is so inclussive. so without forth delay i would like to welcome you on behalf of mator's office of neighborhood services. mayor lee will be joining us later. with the invocations, we would like to invite pastor stacey kerns. >> good amp. let us pause for a moment to invite the presence of god. shall we pray together? god, our help in ages past, our hope in years to come, we invite your holy presence to bless this celebration of african-american history month. we give up thanks and praise for the legacy, the creativity, the genius and contributions of african-american people everywhere. we pray that you would strengthen this organization and strengthen all organizations that support telling the story of black history. and so today we ask that a
inspiring words, doctor. today, we have to use our imagination. this is a large space that we will have within the next 18 months a beautiful state of the art library. if you can imagine hundreds of youngsters walking through the door here on third avenue, going into a wonderful spacious children's room, full of materials to inspire and have their creative juices flowing. then we will have another wonderful space on this side for teenagers, for them to be in a save in welcoming environment, for them to be created to develop their minds. what better place than a neighborhood library? behind me, a wonderful courtyard to enjoy days like today in the bayview. where you are seated in front of me, we will have an amazing collection of books, materials. this will be 25% bigger than the library that was already here. state-of-the-art with computers, wi-fi, providing access to our young people's. a wonderful community programs, lectures, to really represent the spirit of bayview. how about that for your new library? let me also say this community has been one of the models for community engagem
today. such a rich legacy that you are giving us. you mentioned to me that you are working on a new album. could you share what is coming up? >> i love to dream when i am awake. kand so i had this dream of working with india arie and yo- yo ma to do the george harrison saw; and "-- song. this is the definitive way to do this. we are all in it together, we do not leave anybody out. t conviction, i am one of the few people that you can recognize by one note. god gave me that universal tone, and that is what we want to implement in all the songs. thank you. >> carlos santana, thank you for accepting the 2010 mayor's part award. >> to watch the ceremony, visit the home page of the arts commission website, sfarts commission >> so it's a tremendous honor to be here today. we've got a tremendous program for you. this is our annual black history month kickoff. it was started many, many years ago. dr. carter g. woodson had participated in the founding of black history month. he was involved in the group known as the oh, -- association for the study of african-american life and history. the l
code. commissioner borden: i think it would be useful to have a joint hearing with of the department of building inspection because there is an issue around fees and we have changed the process to deal with that issue. it is a big problem that they don't fly all for occupancy. i think the other issue that we generally talked about is what real estate agents represent and we see it all the time. it is sometimes contrary to what the code actually says. i don't know how we can come down on those agents. denny's to be a conversation, maybe have someone from the association of realtors here to talk about this issue because this is not the first kind of case we have had like this. they are innocent i think in this situation. >> v three r report, it is something that the building department maintains. that typically says, that is what we rely on for the number of units in a building. it is something that has to be generated around the time of the transfer. maybe that is why the issue has come up as much. since is live work, it is not subject to the requirements. commissioner borden: i think
factors in considering secondary land use? what should be our primary or secondary use? do you want to have food? do you want to have a playground? how do we weigh in and make some judgments on that? and what about properties with no primary utility purpose? do we hang on to them? do we look at them as a future needs, or what? we created some categories underneath each one of these questions, so when you look at keefe factors, its compatibility with utility needs, if there is a primary purpose, is it compatible? you do not want a gas station next to your reservoir. that is not something that would be compatible. the economic impact to the ratepayers. it should not be that the rate payers are subsidizing that use. it should be standing on its other. it should create a liability question for you. it should open it up to some sort of long-term. your priorities, whether or not it is for other things, and finally, is this a permanent use, or does it have an exit strategy? if you need to take this property for utility purpose sometime in the future, i am not talking five years from now, m
center, who was trying to help low- income immigrants adjust to life in the u.s. new life after amnesty, a lot of people were not able to immigrate because of a lack of money. still to this point, i see a lot of immigrants who want to get their work permits. i ask them how long they have been here. sometimes they have been here since the 1970's, 1980's, 1990's. a lot of them are elderly who are ready to retire. i had 165-year-old man who is alone, no family -- a 65-year- old man who is alone, no family here, but he does not have any papers to get that social security that he has contributed to for 30 years. he will be homeless after working for many years. i faced this situation with my clients a lot. i help low income people. sometimes it is very difficult. sometimes i think about how small the world is a and i see how immigration laws are changing. immigration rates started about 40 years ago and i started to see my client to come to me. my husband has been here 10 years and all of a sudden, his employer is asking for a work permit. we have two children. we just bought a home. what ar
instruments. >> (speaking spanish). >> so they use the surroundings and big jars and they used to have water or other type was drinks. >> (speaking spanish). >> covered with leather skin. >> (speaking spanish). >> and they make the drums. >>. >> (speaking spanish). (drums). (applause). >> (speaking spanish). >> this instrument is called dungo. >> spr (speaking spanish). >> we have two but only one was used. >> (speaking spanish). >> this is one that was used north of the capital. >> (speaking spanish). >> in the cities of the country >> (speaking spanish). >> when he was a child he was able to see those instruments and on extension today. (drums). (applause) . >> this is a donkey's jaw. it could be a horse or a donkey. >> donkey's jaw. >> and it's played by spiking it and to make the rattle sound and also creates this. (applause). >> (speaking spanish) sorry. (speaking spanish). >> this is the kahita and it is created as the -- i don't know that word. how do you say that? the piggy bank. you know where the boxes and the churches collect money? yeah. this is the original he here. yeah.
sustainable ideas, like using a natural light in the spaces and have windows that really opened to provide ventilation. we're very, very keen on investigating new technologies, as well, for power generation right on site, including some of the ones i have talked about already. this is a view of one of the interior is bringing some of those key things in, drawing the light down and inside, making for a very green and stimulating environment. you have also seen throughout these designs, at the -- these approaches to create buildings that share a common theme and relationship to one another better not uniform in shape and size. this is a view along the third straight quarter, which gives you a good idea of the mapping you will see. we're not building tall towers here. we want to encourage collaboration between employees. and we're making liberal use of color. i think that was one reason we clicked from the very beginning. we saw the desire to reflect in this new campus the kind of color that we see everywhere in san francisco. this is not going to be boring granite and green glass
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,297 (some duplicates have been removed)